The Latest

Oct 19, 2014 / 176 notes

studioafrica:

I’m super excited to share the teaser from THE BL∆CK HE∆RTS CLUB ( @BLVKHRTS) debut single. Can’t wait for people to hear the full song… Sooner than you think!

-Alec Lomami

(via yagazieemezi)

Oct 19, 2014 / 24,641 notes

kingofhispaniola:

Do yall even know the history of braids

(via yagazieemezi)

justbrad:

Asha & Quinn aka http://www.qplusa.co/
Oct 19, 2014 / 309 notes

justbrad:

Asha & Quinn aka http://www.qplusa.co/

(via yagazieemezi)

Oct 19, 2014 / 89 notes

yagazieemezi:

Strange Fruit

The peaceful daily routine of father and son is interrupted by an encounter of an unfamiliar boy, different from them in color. An allegory to the phenomena of racism as an acquired cultural epidemic, the story discusses the question of the personal conscience of each of us, versus the education we receive from our families and environment. Can we really insist on our personal belief system, when what we must believe in, is dictated to us?
The film presents how easily we acquire fear and hatred of foreigners, as well as how easily we might become the “strangers” and “others” ourselves.

Quite frankly, it’s a lot more than video desciption

Directors: Shimi Asresay and Hili Noy
Original Soundtrack: Itai Argaman
Sound Effects: Ohad Zrihen

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Oct 19, 2014 / 790 notes

vivaillajams:

Amara

I miss my little sister so much. She’s great. Just look at her. And all that beauty.

She wants to follow in my footsteps and become a designer.

(via yagazieemezi)

Oct 19, 2014 / 9,258 notes

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)

Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate

When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.

In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.

Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.

In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Oct 19, 2014 / 2,281 notes

yagazieemezi:

The majority of what I draw is pulled from my personal life be it random thoughts that pop up or actual stuff that happens to me. Although the colors are digital, I still stick to using good ol’ paper and pen for my cartoons. I simple believe that there can never be enough brown girl cartoons. - Yagazie Emezi

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Oct 19, 2014 / 24,006 notes

yagazieemezi:

Nadine Ijewere is a photographer out of London with an amazing talent for portraiture and fashion photography. She creates  beautiful environments for her work using from floral and cultural influences. I love it all.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Oct 19, 2014 / 4,091 notes

yagazieemezi:

I feel so alive to have stumbled upon I go by Frankie!

" Randomly, I’m as mad and rude as a Parisian girl should be, I love French fries, red wine, high heels and mayonnaise. I throw “bitch” everywhere cause my mum doesn’t speak English. I secretly wish I’ll be a gangsta in my next life. I hate fishnet tights, the number 3, Ugg boots, Brussels sprouts and the number 14. I don’t trust the Mayans, the weather forecast lady and TFL’ service updates – among other bitches.

More seriously, I am also a personal stylist (buying clothes with other people’s money is something highly enjoyable) and a fashion digital marketer.” - www.igobyfrankie.com

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Oct 19, 2014 / 997 notes

yagazieemezi:

MAKI OH SPRING 2015 COLLECTION

Seeing this collection, there’s no questioning why she was invited to meet Michelle Obama as part of Obama’s most admired fashion designers.

The collection infuses traditional adire prints into soft fabrics in shapes that are familiar territory for Maki Oh – the boxy top, the midi, tapered shirts. Silk has always had a place in her collections but here she adds rich cottons and dense, spongy honeycomb mesh. (source)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Oct 19, 2014 / 110 notes

jubrilagoro:

Black People In Medellin, Colombia

Me just sharing my experience of being black in Colombia. This beautiful country has treated me so SO good. Hopefully you will get to visit and see the everything for yourself.

Youtube | Instagram | Facebook

(via yagazieemezi)

Oct 19, 2014 / 4,456 notes

yagazieemezi:

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. “It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be.”

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself." (keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic